MP Board Class 10th Science Solutions Chapter 16 Management of Natural Resources

MP Board Class 10th Science Solutions Chapter 16 Management of Natural Resources

MP Board Class 10th Science Chapter 16 Intext Questions

Class 10th Science Chapter 16 Intext Questions Page No. 269

Question 1.
What changes can you make in your habits to become more environment-friendly?
Answer:
We should switch off the electrical appliances when not in use. Water and food should not in wasted. Close the tap when not in use, Dump the objects made of plastic and glass in designated recycling boxes. Plastic, paper or glass must be recycled or reused and not dumped with other wastes. This is because objects made of plastic do not get decomposed easily. Besides soil fertility, they badly affect our environment. We should dispose the wastes safely and not disperse in public places. These are a few things that can be done to become more environment-friendly.

Question 2.
What would be the advantages of exploiting resources with short-term aims?
Answer:
There should be a judicious use of natural resources as they are limited in nature. We should not exploit resources for our short term gains as this would only lead to depletion of natural resources for the present generation as well as generations to come. Hence, we say that there are hardly any advantages of exploiting natural resources for short term gains.

Question 3.
How would these advantages differ from the advantages of using a long-term perspective in managing our resources?
Answer:
In the case of a long-time perspective in managing our resources, these resources will last for the generations to come. This management ensures uniform distribution among the people. It conserves the ‘ natural resources for many years and not just for a few years, as in the case of a short-term perspective in conserving natural resources.

Question 4.
Why do you think there should be equitable distribution of resources? What forces would be working against an equitable distribution of our resources?
Answer:
Natural resources of the Earth must be distributed among the people uniformly so that each and every one gets his share of the resource. Human greed, corruption and the lobby of the rich and powerful are thq forces working against an equitable distribution of resources.

MP Board Solutions

Class 10th Science Chapter 16 Intext Questions Page No. 273

Question 1.
Why should we conserve forests and wildlife?
Answer:
We should conserve forests and wildlife to preserve the biodiversity (range of different life-forms) so as to avoid the loss of ecological stability. A large number of tribes are the habitants in and around the forests. If the forests are not conserved,- then it may affect these habitants. Without proper management of forest and wildlife, the quality of soil, the water sources and even the amount of rainfall may be affected. Without forest and wildlife, life would become impossible for human beings.

Question 2.
Suggest some approaches towards the conservation of forests.
Answer:
Some approaches towards the conservation of forests are as follows:

(a) People should show their participation in saving the forest by protesting against the tv ting of trees. For example, Chipko Andolan.
(b) Planting of bees should be increased. Rate of afforestation must be more than that of deforestation.
(c) Some people cut precious trees such as sandalwood to earn money. Government should take legal steps to catch these wood smugglers.
(d) Habitants of forests must not be bothered by the forest officials. Otherwise, this would result in the clash between tribal people and the

government officials, thereby enhancing the naxal activities in forests.

Class 10th Science Chapter 16 Intext Questions Page No. 276

Question 1.
Find out about the traditional systems of water harvesting/management in your region.
Answer:
One of the traditional systems of water harvesting used in our region is tanks. There may be other systems like ponds, water reservoirs etc.

Question 2.
Compare the above system with the probable systems in hilly/ mountainous areas or plains or plateau regions.
Answer:
In plains, the water harvesting structures are crescent-shaped earthen embankments. These are low, straight and concrete. In hilly regions, the system of canal irrigation called Kulyths is used for water harvesting. This involves a collection of rain water in a stream, which is then diverted into manmade channels down the hill sides.

Question 3.
Find out the source of w ater in your region/locality. Is water from this source available to all people living in that area?
Answer:
The source of water in our region is ground water. Water from the source is available to all the people living in that area.

MP Board Solutions

MP Board Class 10th Science Chapter 16 NCERT Textbook Exercises

Question 1.
What changes would you suggest in your home in order to be environment-friendly?
Answer:
Changes that can be undertaken in our homes to be environment friendly are listed below:

  1. Switch off the electrical appliances when not in use.
  2. Turn the taps off while brushing or bathing and repair the leaking taps.
  3. Throw biodegradable and non-biodegradable waste into separate bins.
  4. Construct composting pits.
  5. Food items such as jam, pickles etc., come packed in plastic bottles. These bottles can later be used for storing things in the kitchen.

Question 2.
Can you suggest some changes in your school which would make it environment-friendly?
Answer:
Changes that can be undertaken in our schools to make it environment friendly are listed below:

  1. Electricity can be saved by switching off lights and fans when not required.
  2. Turn the taps off when not in use.
  3. Biodegradable and non-biodegradable wastes should be thrown into separate bins.

Question 3.
We saw in this chapter that there are four main stakeholders when it comes to forests and wildlife. Which among these should have the authority to decide the management of forest produce? Why do you think so?
Answer:
The forest department of the government should have the authority to decide the management of forest produces. This is because the forest department is the care taker of the forest land and is responsible for any damage to the forest.

Question 4.
How can you as an individual contribute or make a difference to the management of
(a) forests and wildlife
(b) water resources
(c) coal and petroleum?
Answer:
(a) Forest and wildlife:

  1. We should protest against the cutting of trees (deforestation).
  2. We should protest against the poaching of wild animals.
  3. We should stop the annexation of forest land for our use.

(b) Water resources:

  1. Turn the taps off while brushing or bathing and repair leaking taps.
  2. We should practice rainwater harvesting.
  3. We should avoid the discharge of sewage and other wastes into rivers and other water resources.

(c) Coal and Petroleum:

  1. We should take a bus or practice car pooling to avoid excessi ve use of petroleum.
  2. We should stop using coal.as a fuel (angithis).
  3. We should use alternative source of energy such as hydro¬energy and solar energy instead of depending largely on coal and petroleum.

Question 5.
What can on as an individual do to reduce your consumption of the various natural resources?
Answer:
Natural resources such as water, forests, coal and petroleum etc. are important for the survival of human beings. The ways in which we can reduce the

consumption of various natural resources are as follows:

  1. We should stop the cutting of trees (deforestation).
  2. We should use recycled paper to reduce the cutting down of trees
  3. We should not waste water.
  4. We should practice rainwater harvesting.
  5. We should practice car pooling to avoid the excessive use of petroleum.
  6. We should use alternative sources of energy such as hydro-energy and solar energy.

Question 6.
List five things you have done over the last one week to:
(a) conserve our natural resources.
(b) increase the pressure on our natural resources.
Answer:
(a) To conserve our natural resources:

  1. Travelled by a CNG bus for long distances and walk for short distances.
  2. Used recycled paper.
  3. Threw biodegradable and non-biodegradable waste into separate bins.
  4. Planted trees.
  5. Harvested rainwater.

(b) To increase the pressure on our natural resources:

  1. Used non-renewable resources of energy.
  2. Wasted water.
  3. Wasted electricity.
  4. Used plastics and polythene bags for carrying goods.
  5. Used escalators.

Question 7.
On the basis of the issues raised in this chapter, what changes would you incorporate in your life-style in a move towards a sustainable use of our resources?
Answer:
One should incorporate the following changes in life-style in a move towards a sustainable use of our resources:

  1. Stop cutting trees and practice plantation of trees.
  2. Stop using plastic and polythene bags for carrying goods.
  3. Use recycled paper.
  4. Throw biodegradable and non-biodegradable waste into separate bins.
  5. Waste minimum amount of water while using and repair leaking taps.
  6. Practice rainwater harvesting.
  7. Avoid using vehicles for short distances. Instead, one can walk or cycle to cover short distances. To cover long distances, one should take a bus instead of using personal vehicles.
  8. Switch off electrical appliances when not in use.
  9. Use fluorescent tubes in place of bulbs to save electricity.
  10. Take stairs and avoid using lifts.
  11. During winters, wear an extra sweater to avoid using heaters.

MP Board Solutions

MP Board Class 10th Science Chapter 16 Additional Important Questions

MP Board Class 10th Science Chapter 16 Multiple Choice Questions

Question 1.
The three R’s to save the environment are:
(a) Reuse
(b) Reduce
(c) Recycle
(d) Reduce, recycle, reuse
Answer:
(d) Reduce, recycle, reuse

Question 2.
Biodiversity is measured by
(a) The number of animals found in an area
(b) The number of mammalian found in an area
(c) The number of species found in an area
(d) The number of insects found in an area
Answer:
(c) The number of species found in an area

Question 3.
What are biodiversity hot spot?
(a) Village
(b) River
(c) Cities
(d) Forests
Answer:
(d) Forests

Question 4.
Harvesting system in hilly areas like Himachal Pradesh uses a local system of irrigation called
(a) Tals
(b) Canals
(c) Kulhs
(d) Ahass
Answer:
(c) Kulhs

Question 5.
Amrita Devi Bishnoi sacrificed her life with 363 people in 1731 to save
(a) Wildlife
(b) Water
(c) Girl child
(d) Trees
Answer:
(d) Trees

Question 6.
Aim of ‘Narmada Bachao Andolan’, was
(a) Stopping dam formation
(b) Stopping ban on dam formation
(c) Stopping water pollution
(d) Garbage maintenance
Answer:
(a) Stopping dam formation

Question 7.
Coli form is
(a) Group ef fungi
(b) Group of viruses
(c) Group of bacteria
(d) All of these
Answer:
(c) Group of bacteria

Question 8.
Main aim of the Chipko movement was:
(a) Water conservation
(b) Ecological conservation
(c) Food conservation
(d) All of the above
Answer:
(b) Ecological conservation

Question 9.
Which gas is a green house gas?
(a) CO2
(b) CO
(c) SO2
(d) NO2
Answer:
(a) CO2

Question 10.
The Chipko movement started in a village called
(a) Reni in Uttarakhand
(b) Kullu
(c) Delhi
(d) Mumbai
Answer:
(a) Reni in Uttarakhand

Question 11.
Indira Gandhi canal is an example of:
(a) River
(b) Man-made dam
(c) Pond
(d) All of these
Answer:
(b) Man-made dam

Question 12.
Kattas in Karnataka is famous for:
(a) Water harvesting
(b) Solar energy
(c) Biodiversity
(d) None
Answer:
(a) Water harvesting

MP Board Class 10th Science Chapter 16 Very Short Answer Type Questions

Question 1.
Define natural resource.
Answer:
The things available from nature are called natural resource.

Question 2.
Name the 3 R’s to save environment.
Answer:
Reduce, recycle, reuse are the 3 R’s to save environment.

Question 3.
Give some examples of natural resources.
Answer:
Examples of natural resources are water, timber and cotton.

Question 4.
What is biodiversity?
Answer:
Biodiversity is number of species that exists in an area.

Question 5.
What increases demand of resources?
Answer:
Increase in human population increases demand of resources.

Question 6.
Why we should need to manage our resources? Give one example.
Answer:
We need to manage our resources for equitable distribution for every individual.

Question 7.
Give one example of stakeholder of forest.
Answer:
People who live in or around forest are best example of stakeholder of forest.

Question 8.
In which village Chipko movement was started?
Answer:
Chipko movement started in Reni village in Uttarakhand.

Question 9.
What was the main purpose of Chipko andolan?
Answer:
To stop tree cutting indiscriminately.

Question 10.
What are the alternative sources to produce energy without creating pollution and disturbing ecological balance?
Answer:
Sunlight, water, wind etc.

Question 11.
Can we recycle everything?
Answer:
No, because everything do not turn in usable form once being used.

Question 12.
What is an example of biodiversity hot spot?
Answer:
Forest.

Question 13.
Write an importance of conservation of wild life.
Answer:
Preserving biodiversity inherited in time.

Question 14.
Write name of one activist for saving water.
Answer:
Rajendra Kumar.

Question 15.
Give an example of a place famous for water management in India.
Answer:
Kulhs in Himachal Pradesh.

MP Board Solutions

MP Board Class 10th Science Chapter 16 Short Answer Type Questions

Question 1.
What are natural resources? Explain.
Answer:
Natural resources can be broadly categorized into two types: exhaustible and non-exhaustible. Management of natural resources is all about their judicious use in a way that the exhaustible resources can lasfr.for many generations to come and non-exhaustible resources can be maintained in as pristine form as possible.

Question 2.
What are three R’s (Reduce, recycle and reuse)?
Answer:
Reduce: We should reduce the consumption of various resources wherever possible. For example; we can reduce the consumption of electricity and water.

Recycle: There are many items which can be recycled again and again. For example by recycling paper, we reduce the demand for wood and thus, help in saving the forest.

Reuse: Many items can be reused many times. For example; old newspaper, envelopes, plastic bottles.

Question 3.
Who are the stakeholders of forest?
Answer:
The stakeholders are as follows:
People living in or around forests; as they depend on various forest produce for their livelihood, the forest department which is the owner of the forest land, various industrialists who depend on forest for many raw materials. For example: wood is used as raw material in many industries.

So, the people, industry and Government body who are directly or indirectly affected by forest are called stakeholders of forest.

Question 4.
Give one example of saving ecosystem by local communities.
Answer:
Chipko Movement: The Chipko movement began in the early 1980s from a small village; Reni in Garhwal district. The women of the village began hugging the trees to prevent the cutting of trees by the contractors. The Chipko movement later spread to other parts of India.

Question 5.
Give some examples of water harvesting method in ancient India.
Answer:

  1. Khadins, tanks and nadis in Rajasthan.
  2. Bandharas and tals in Maharashtra.
  3. Bundhis in Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh.
  4. Ahars and pynes in Bihar.
  5. Kulhs in Himachal Pradesh.
  6. Ponds in the Kandi belt of Jammu region and eris (tanks) in Tamil Nadu. Surangams in Kerala, and Kattas in Karnataka.

These are some of the ancient water harvesting examples and still in use at many places.

Question 6.
What is the importance of traditional water harvesting structures?
Answer:
The traditional water harvesting structures usually focus on recharging the groundwater rather making an open reservoir. It has several advantages. Unlike surface water; the groundwater does not evaporate and»thus, loss because of evaporation is prevented. The groundwater does not provide a breeding ground for the mosquitoes and hence is good for public health as well. The groundwater is relatively protected from contamination by human activities.

Question 7.
Why alternate energy sources is required in place of Coal and Petroleum? Give examples of alternate sources.
Answer:
Coal and petroleum are the main energy resources for us. But, since these are exhaustible in nature so, we need to find out alternate sources of energy. Scientists are working on developing some alternate energy sources so that dependency on coal and petroleum can be reduced. Some examples are given below:

  1. Solar energy is being used to produce electricity at many places. Although, this technology is still costly.
  2. Fuel cell is another development which may help in replacing the internal combustion engines from automobiles.
  3. Hydrogen is being used as fuel in buses and cars in many countries. Hydrogen; when used as a fuel produces water as a by-product. Thus, hydrogen can be an environment-friendly fuel.

MP Board Solutions

MP Board Class 10th Science Chapter 16 Long Answer Type Questions

Question 1.
Explain consequences of exploitation of natural resources and sustainable development.
Answer:
There are many consequences of exploitation of natural resources.
Some examples are given below:

  1. Burning of fossil fuels creates air pollution. Excess amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere leads to global warming.
    Some polluting gases; like oxides of nitrogen and sulphur lead to acid rain, which is harmful for living beings. Acid rain is also harmful for monuments and buildings.
  2. Excess exploitation of groundwater leads to a drastic fall in water table. For this reason many places are experiencing acute shortage of drinking water.
  3. Overuse of fertilisers and insecticides leads to soil pollution and soil erosion.
  4. Many pollutants are directly flown into water bodies. This has resulted in water pollution in many rivers, lakes and even in oceans.

Sustainable Development:

Development is necessary for making all around economic development. But development often comes with a price in the form of environmental damage. Sustainable development means following certain practices which help in saving our environment from damage. This is necessary for maintaining the earth in a good shape so, that future generations can also enjoy bounty of nature.

Question 2.
What are three R’s?
Answer:
1. Reduce: We should reduce the consumption of various resources wherever possible. For example; we can reduce the consumption of electricity by switching off lights and other appliances when they are not required. While leaving the home, one should always check for fans and lights and switch them off. This cannot only help in saving electricity but also in saving the fuels which are utilised in electricity production. We should immediately repair a leaking tap so that precious water can be saved.

2. Recycle: There are many items which can be recycled again and again. Recycling is another way of reducing the demand for natural resources. For example; by recycling paper, we reduce the demand for wood and thus, help in saving the forest.

3. Reuse: Many items can be reused many times. For example; old newspaper can be used for packing many items. Old envelopes can be used, for doing rough work while doing homework. Old plastic bottles can be used for many other purposes.

Question 3.
Explain Arabari’s example of People’s Participation in Forest Management.
Answer:
In 1972, the forest department realized its mistake while reviving the degraded sal forests of Arabari forest range. Arabari forest lies in Midnapore district of West Bengal. The earlier methods of policing and surveillance were a total failure as they often led to frequent clashes with local people. It also led to alienation of people from the conservation programme. Then, came a forest officer; named A.K Baneijee; who was a real visionary. He involved the local people in the revival of 1,272 hectares of forest. In lieu of that the villagers were given employment in silviculture and were given 25% of the harvest. They were also allowed to gather firewood and fodder against a nominal payment. Due to active participation of the local community, there was remarkable revival of the Arabari sal forest. By 1983, the value of the forest rose to ? 12.5 crores.

Question 4.
Explain in brief about people ‘effort for forest conservation’.
Answer:
Bishnoi community: The Bishnoi community of Rajasthan is one such example. Amrita Devi Bishnoi is still remembered with reverence for the way she fought for protecting the khejri trees in Khejrali village. She along with 363 other people sacrificed her life for the protection of khejri trees in 1731. The ‘Amrita Devi Bishnoi National Award for Wildlife Conservation’ has been named in her honour.

Nomadic herders of the Himalayas: The nomadic herders used to graze their animals near the great Himalayan National Park. Every summer, the nomadic people brought their herds down the valley so that the sheep could get plenty of grass to eat. When the National Park was made in that area, the nomadic herders were stopped from grazing their sheep in the protected area. Now, in the absence of grazing by the sheep, the grasses grew very tall in the region. Tall grasses fall over and prevent fresh growth of grass. This shows that by excluding and alienating the local people from forests, proper conservation efforts cannot be carried out.

Chipko movement: The Chipko began in the early 1980s from a small village; Reni in Garhwal district. The women of the village began hugging tree to prevent the cutting of trees by the contractors. The Chipko movement later spread to other parts of India.

Question 5.
Give two examples of forest conservation by local communities.
Answer:
Following are two examples of Forest conservation by local
communities:

1. The Chipko movement began in the early 1980s from a small village; Reni in Garhwal district. The women of the village began hugging a tree to prevent the cutting of trees by the contractors. There are many examples which suggest that involvement of local communities is necessary for any conservation effort. The Bishnoi community of Rajasthan is one such example. Amrita Devi Bishnoi is still remembered with reverence for the way she fought for protecting the khejri trees in Khejrali village. She along with 363 other people, sacrificed her life for the protection of Khejri trees in 1731. The ‘Amrita Devi Bishnoi National Award for Wildlife Conservation’ has been named in her honour.

2. Another example is of the nomadic herders of the Himalayas. The nomadic herders used to graze their animals near the great Himalayan National Park. Every summer, the nomadic people bought their herds down the valley so that the sheep could get plenty of grass to eat. When the National Park was made in that area, the nomadic herders were stopped from grazing their sheep in the protected area. Now in the absence of grazing by the sheep, the grasses grew very tall in the region. Tall grasses fall over and prevent fresh growth of grass. This shows that by excluding and alienating the local people from forests, proper conservation efforts cannot be carried out.

MP Board Solutions

MP Board Class 10th Science Chapter 16 NCERT Textbook Activities

Class 10 Science Activity 16.1 Page No. 266

  • Find out about the international norms to regulate the emission of carbon dioxide.
  • Have a discussion in class about how we can contribute towards meeting those norms.

Observations:

  • There are many laws and norms made to regulate the emission of various gases that creates harm to the environment. One of the norms related to CO2 emission is based on ‘Kyoto protocol’ where all industrialised countries come forward to minimize the collective emission of CO2 and other green house gases.

Class 10 Science Activity 16.2 Page No. 267

  • There are a number of organisations that seek to spread awareness about our environment and promote activities and attitudes that lead to the conservation of our environment and natural resources. Find out about the organisations(s) active in your neighbourhood/village townicity.
  • Find out how you can contribute towards the same cause,

Observations:

  • There are many organisations spreading awareness about environment and promoting activities for its benefit. Different states of India have number of organisations. The name of new includes – Ionosphere Social Enterprise, The energy and resonance Institute IRADe, Elnora International, Delhi Greens, Greenpeace India, GVNMAL, India Nateere watch, Kalpvriksh. Nation’s club. National biodiversity Authority etc.

Class 10 Science Activity 16.3 Page No. 266

  • Check the pH of the water supplied to your house using universal indicator or litmus paper.
  • Also check the pH of the water in the local waterbody (pond, river, lake, stream).
  • Can you say whether the water is polluted or not on the basis of your observations?

Observations:

  • The normal range for pH in our house may be between 6.5 to 8.5. The pH of local water bodies are around 5.7.
  • The water showing little less pH than recommended in water bodies may indicate pollution due to slight acidic substances which make the water acidic showing decrease in pH.
  • The optimum range for water bodies in around 6-8.5, the variations in it indicates pollutions.

Class 10 Science Activity 16.4 Page No. 269

  • Have you ever visited a town or village after a few years of absence? If so, have you noticed new roads and houses that have come up since you were there last? Where do you think the materials for making these roads and buildings have come from?
  • Try and make a list of the materials and their probable sources.
  • Discuss the list you have prepared with your classmates. Can you think of ways in which the use of these materials be reduced?

Observations:

  • Yes, new roads and houses are coming up very fastly in villages. The materials generally comes from the neighbouring cities and areas where it is build.
  • The materials for building roads and buildings includes concrete, composite pavement, asphalt, bituminous, gravel surfaces etc.
  • These can be reduced by opting for less toxic and dangerous materials like bituminous and asphalt may be avoided and replaced by sand and naturally made materials.

Class 10 Science Activity 16.5 Page No. 270

  • Observe various traditional practices for conservation of nature in your day-to day life. Share within the peer group. Make a report and submit.

Observations:

  • Various traditional practices for conservation of nature includes various practices like:
  • Religious traditions – temple forest, monastery forests etc.
  • Traditional tribal traditions – sacred forests, sacred trees etc.
  • Royal traditions – royal hunting practices and preserves, royal gardens etc.
  • Livelihood traditions – forests and grows serving as cultural and social space.

Class 10 Science Activity 16.6 Page No. 271

  • Make a list of forest produce that you use.
  • What do you think a person living near a forest would use?
  • What do you think a person living in a forest would use?
  • Discuss with your classmates how these needs differ or do not differ and the reasons for the same.

Observations:

  • Forest produce that are use includes:
  • Wood, sandalwood, rubber, latex, paper, food (fruits and vegetables), Sponges, wood fuel etc.
  • A person living near a forest will use wood as fuel, fruits and Vegetables, rubber, sandal cored etc.
  • A person leaving in a forest will decrease the storage of forest produce and can used hand in hand as and when required. The use of many things will reduce.
  • The person living near will have different requirements as compared to person duriug-inside forest as maximum needs of people living in forest wall increase as he can directly take from there neither than cutting or taking from native and then utilising

Class 10 Science Activity 16.7 Page 272

  • Find out about any two forest produce that are the basis for an industry.
  • Discuss whether this industry is sustainable in the long run. Or do we viced to control our consumption of these products?

Observations:

  • Any two forest produce that are basis for an industry arc wood and coal.
  • This industry is not sustainable in the long run as the limited supply for these products are available in nature and we are using them at very high speed. We need to reduce the consumption and wastage of such products. The natural resources should be used judiciously.

Class 10 Science Activity 16.8 Page No. 275

  • Debate the damage caused to forests by the following:
    • (a) Building rest houses for tourists in national parks.
    • (b) Grazing domestic animals in national parks.
    • (c) Tourists throwing plastic bottles, covets and other litter in national parks.

Observations:

  • The building rest houses for tourists in national parts causes a lot increase in deforestation which disturbs the balance of the nature. The animals and other living organisms living in an ecosystem also gets disturbed and whole area is effected.
  • Grazing domestic animals leads to destruction of green grasses and shrubs which destroy the green cover of the park. This also effects the other dependent organisms of the park.
  • The plastic bottles/covers and other litter thrown in the national parks makes the park very dirty making it unfit in providing healthy living conditions to the animals. These substances do not decompose and remain there creating pollution for years and leading to destruction of various organisms.

Class 10 Science Activity 16.9 Page No. 275

  • Villages suffering from chronic water shortage surround a water theme park in Maharashtra. Debate whether this is the optimum use of the available water.

Observations:

  • No, this is not the optimum use of the available water. Water theme park in Maharashtra uses water in large animals for the amusement purposes. This water can be used for various other basic needs. There is acute shortage of water in nearby areas. This water can fulfill the needs there.

Class 10 Science Activity 16.10 Page No. 275

  • Study the rainfall patterns in India from an atlas.
  • Identify the regions where water is abundant and the regions of water scarcity.

Observations:

  • The monsoon affect the most part of India, the amount of rainfall varies from heavy to scanty in different parts. There is great temporal and regional variation in distribution of rainfall. Over 80% of annual rainfall is received in four rainy months of June to September.
  • The regions with abundant water includes – most of Canada, Great Lakes, Ireland, Amazon (Brazil), Antarctica.
  • The regions of water scarcely includes – Middle East, Sahara Desert, Atacama Desert, India, Gobi Desert

Class 10 Science Activity 16.11 Page No. 279

  • Coal is used in thermal power stations and petroleum products like petrol and diesel are used in means of transport like motor vehicles, ships and aeroplanes. We cannot really imagine life without a number of electrical appliances and constant use of transportation. So can you think of ways in which our consumption of coal and petroleum products be reduced?

Observations:

  • We can reduce our consumption of coal and petroleum by using other means of energy like solar, hydral, wind and various other natural forms of energy. These sources are renewable and do not cause any harm to the nature.

Class 10 Science Activity 16.12 Page No. 279

  • You must have heard of the euro I and Euro II norms for emission from vehicles; Find out how these norms work towards reducing air pollution.

Observations:

  • Euro norms refer to the permissible emission levels from both petrol and diesel vehicles. They are available for fuel quality and the method of testing. These norms decides how much a can should smoke and the particles emitted out. It have been in Europe first and then it was also implemented in India as well in the name of Bharat stage I and II.

MP Board Class 10th Science Solutions

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